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another steve s

another steve s
Location
Sacramento, California, USA
Birthday
January 01
Bio
I can remove my brain at will. My original posts appear at Zoomers.ca. BTW, I really wasn't born on January 1.

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APRIL 3, 2012 3:48PM

“Mus-turdy” Taters, or Pommes au Dijon

Rate: 8 Flag

Walter Blevin’s oven roasted salt & vinegar potatoes  made me think of this recipe.

 

 Pommes de Terre au Dijon 

Chop around 2 pounds of potatoes into fork-sized chunks. Peel them or don’t peel them, it’s up to you.

 

Whisk together this dressing in a bowl large enough for tossing the potatoes:

 

Required ingredients:

 

1/3 cup Dijon mustard (use the cheap store-brand stuff)

2 tablespoons olive oil (again, the cheap stuff is fine, hey, it’s just potatoes)

 

Optional ingredients:

1 minced clove of garlic

Chopped rosemary (only bother if you have a rosemary shrub nearby)

 

Toss the potatoes in the dressing until every piece is coated.

 

Bake at 425 F for 30 to 40 minutes, occasionally stirring, until the potatoes are tender.

_____________________________________________________

 

This recipe doubles well, provided you have a big enough baking pan.

 

The same dressing and cooking method works for any sturdy root vegetable. Rutabagas and parsnips done this way are one of our winter favorites.

Author tags:

food, foodie tuesday

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Comments

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The avatar begs the question:

I don't do this with cauliflower. I don't like roasted cauliflower. I prefer to steam or stwe cauliflower.
Thanks for the recipe, Steve; sounds awesome. R
This sounds easy, quick, and good--my requirements are met.
I think I'm going to have to give this one a try, Steve. I wonder how it would work with my favorite, super hot Beaverton Spicy Mustard? Might be just a little bit much--I'll stick to dijon.
I think almost any kind of mustard would work. The roasting heat breaks it down and smooths out the rough edges of the mustard taste.
Sounds delicious and simple -- two of my favorite things!
AMong our favorites, too. Sometimes we have boiled cabbage, potatoes and carrots for dinner, with lots of mustard. Even add a little corned beef if times are good.
I made corned beef and cabbage AFTER St. Paddy's day (got the corned beef on sale that way!) with carrots and onions. And good locally made robust mustard. I love a good mustard.
I've made something like this before and it is delicious./r
Yum....You always make me want to try these recipes! Maybe I'll get brave enough to do it this time!
This should do well en France. There must be some conection between Dijon mustard and Dijon, and perhaps you can make this to honor Antoine-Augustin Parmentier . Parmentier is credited with bringing France up to speed with respect to potatoes.