Chauncey DeVega

Chauncey DeVega
Location
Chicago, Illinois, USA
Birthday
September 11
Title
A (Sometimes) Respectable Negro
Bio
Editor and Founder of the blog We Are Respectable Negroes He has been a guest on the BBC, Ring of Fire Radio, Ed Schultz, Joshua Holland's Alternet Radio Hour, the Burt Cohen show, and Our Common Ground. His essays have been featured by Salon, Alternet, the New York Daily News, and the Daily Kos. The NY Times, the Daily Beast, the Utne Reader, Washington Monthly, Slate, and the Week (among others) have featured his expert commentary and analysis on race, politics, and popular culture.

Chauncey DeVega's Links

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NOVEMBER 5, 2012 4:22PM

A Country of Strangers: Racial Framing and Superstorm Sandy

Rate: 9 Flag

Superstorm Sandy has made the divisions of class in the New York City area readily apparent. The "haves" are able to muster the resources to somehow survive. The "have nots" are left to their own devices.

Superstorm Sandy has also reminded us of how race remains one of the main dividing lines in our society. While naked displays of racism are now outside of the norms of "polite society," racial micro-aggressions, the day-to-day moments of white racial hostility and animus towards people of color, continue onward.

Racial micro-aggressions can impact the lives of black and brown folks in ways that are "just" inconvenient--the store detective that follows you around while shopping; being asked for ID when using a credit card; when your friends or colleagues "complement" you by saying you are one of "the special" or "good" ones.

Alternatively, these racial micro-aggressions can also be deadly in their outcomes.

Superstorm Sandy has yet to provide an iconic example of white racist media framing such as when during Hurricane Katrina, black people were described as "looters," and whites, also trying to survive, were captioned in news photos as "looking for food."

A lack of an iconic moment does not mean that race no longer impacts life outcomes, the safety and health of people of color, or how white society chooses to view (or not) African-Americans as full members of the polity and broader community.

Tragically, the drowning deaths of two black children while their mother, a black woman, begged for help in a white ethnic suburban community in Staten Island--and then was left crying and broken on the porch of a house for 12 hours when its owner refused her aid (and did not call authorities for assistance)--is a reminder of how the color line can kill you.

Neighborhoods are fundamentally prefaced upon community and belonging. America is a profoundly segregated society. Few people, especially those in the suburbs, explore the causes and history behind this phenomenon. America's segregated communities are a result of decisions by real estate agents, home owners, government, and individuals.

Historically, the whiteness of these communities--what were called "sundown towns"--was protected through violence, intimidation, and murder of non-whites.

Until the near present, white communities could be maintained by law through such practices as "red lining" and restrictive housing covenants. For example, New York, and Long Island in particular, were the sites of some of the first planned suburban communities in the post-World War 2 era. These neighborhoods, Levittown being the most famous of them all, were "racially exclusive." In plain English: no blacks or non-whites were allowed to live there.

In the Age of Obama, the racial exclusivity of white communities is protected by informal norms and practices. Real estate agents will not show people of color property in certain neighborhoods, regardless of their ability to buy a home there. Neighbors are less than welcoming to these new arrivals if they somehow manage to move in.

Police will harass and profile racial minorities, blacks and Latinos in particular, if they happen to be traveling through white neighborhoods such as the Jersey Shore, and certain parts of Staten Island, for example.

Moreover, housing segregation is so prevalent in Staten Island that the Staten Island Expressway has been rechristened the "Mason-Dixon" line by locals in the area.

During Superstorm Sandy, Glenda Moore and her two children, Connor and Brandon (aged 4 and 2) found themselves the victims of this reality.

Neighborhoods create boundaries around who is considered a stranger. Strangers can be ignored. We are taught to be wary of them. In some cases, strangers can be made into legitimate targets for violence and threat. Black Americans are existential strangers in their own country. Our status as citizens is contingent on white approval and acceptance--even if you are President of the United States. African Americans are assumed to be a threat and a perilous type of stranger until we prove otherwise.

The murder of Trayvon Martin by George Zimmerman was an example where a neighborhood vigilante decided that a black teenager was a particular type of stranger, dangerous by nature, who could be shot dead in the street without consequences.

During Superstorm Sandy, Allen, the homeowner in question, decided that Glenda was a stranger who could be ignored while her children drowned. Here, the stereotype and logic is one where black strangers in white neighborhoods are automatically looters and brigands. They can never be a mother fighting to save the lives of her children.

America is a sick society. Racism is internalized by all Americans. Glenda Moore's loss of her two children is a horrible example of how implicit and subconscious racial bias can impact a white person's level of empathy and sympathy towards African-Americans. A woman cried, begged, and screamed for help while her children drowned. A decision was made by a white neighborhood that this type of person, in that gendered body, with that skin color, was not worthy of assistance.

For twelve hours she pleaded for help. Her children died. Students of race and politics often discuss these matters in the abstract, and through examples grounded in a careful study of social and political institutions, as well as Power. The death of Glenda Moore's children, and her treatment that evening by the people in that neighborhood, is an example of racial immorality on the most personal level.

Some other thoughts and questions about racial framing and SuperStorm Sandy:

1. Has racial framing become more or less prominent in the media's coverage of Superstorm Sandy? I have noticed a good number of photos where people of color are shown in line waiting for gasoline and food. I have not seen many similar images of white people. In discussions of looting, the only stories I have seen have featured black men. Have any of you seen stories about social disorder following Superstorm Sandy in white communities?

2. The white victims of SuperStorm Sandy in Staten Island, and the Jersey Shore in particular, have been framed by the media as "hearty" stalwarts and survivors. In comparison to Hurricane Katrina, why is their decision to stay put after an evacuation order, not being interrogated as that of "irresponsible" people?

3. If Glenda Moore were white, and her children were "white" how would the coverage be different? In one of the worst storms in recent memory, why is this not a huge story? Alternatively, what if a white woman was refused help in a black neighborhood and her children then died? What would result?

4. Moreover, white people's demands for assistance are being treated as legitimate and reasonable. Where is the critique of "lazy, not self-reliant, and entitled" people who should have "personal responsibility" for their choices that greeted the survivors of Hurricane Katrina?

5. Will the white folks who are seeking assistance from FEMA, and then voting for Mitt Romney, understand their hypocrisy? Will they be made more or less sympathetic to others, especially people of color, who find themselves in need of government aid and assistance?

6. If you want a reminder of how white privilege and the white racial frame can color a person's understanding of reality, and levels of empathy and sympathy towards the Other, read the comment sections on either Youtube or in the online press regarding the tragic drowning deaths of Glenda Moore's children.

7. Glenda Moore's two children were fathered by a white man. In many ways, the multiracial movement is prefaced on gaining white privilege for those people who are of a "mixed race" background in order to create a buffer race and colored class.

The white parentage through their father of those two beautiful black children did not extend any privilege, or sense of white kinship to them, through their mother. The boundaries of white community were not broad enough to save those two children.

The "one drop" rule is real in American society. For example, while some white folks are confused (and even offended) by Barack Obama's claim to a black identity, this tragic event is more proof that in this society African Americans of a "mixed race" background are still stigmatized by their blackness. In total, White privilege, and their "white" lineage, did not save Glenda Moore's two children. It left them to drown and die.

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There is nothing I can say.It's so incredibly cruel.
The boys are dead and the family has been crushed.

~r~
"Will the white folks who are seeking assistance from FEMA, and then voting for Mitt Romney, understand their hypocrisy?"

No more than Konservative Kristians understand their hypocrisy in voting for a man who is by their "lights" a heretic member of a cult ... no more than those who claim to abhor dishonesty in government understand their hypocrisy in voting for a pathological liar ... no more than family values voters understand their hypocrisy in voting for a selfish sociopath whose business practices utterly destroyed countless families.

It's a fool's game to expect honesty from hypocrites, reason from the unreasonable, and compassion from conservatives.
How could anyone have looked away, have not reached out, brought her in, helped in whatever way they could ... this mother and her little boys ... how many storms still rage here ...
Interesting. I'd heard a little about this incident but the account I heard didn't mention the race of anyone involved. If I'd known what it was really about I'd have paid more attention.

Racial micro-aggressions. New term. Not bad.

You're going to get criticized for turning Sandy into a racial issue, because you always get criticized for that sort of thing, so I'll answer up front for you to save you the trouble:

I didn't ask for these acts of racial micro-aggression. The fact that they exist and are still so prevalent is not due to anything on my part. If you say: How could you make a natural disaster about race? I'll reply: You have it backward: I am not making it about race, I'm reporting that the media manage to inject racism even into natural disaster reporting. During such a crisis, where do they even find the time and energy to be racist? How could they, even in the middle of such a huge crisis, characterize equal victims so unequally? How could they cover equal victims so unequally? How could they react so callously to the callous disregard toward the fates of those two innocent little boys? Do you think I want 24/7 racism? How can they continue to practice racism even in the middle of a hurricane? Don't they ever stop?

And when are you going to get around to putting a stop to tolerating it? A hurricane with severe flooding clearly isn't enough, so what does it take?
-----------------------------------
Chauncey didn't write the above comment, I did. If you choose to disagree with it, I have no objection to taking the abuse. Not that he needs the help.
mr de vega is always interesting and often amusing. if i were brown perhaps i could get away with expressing my feelings for white americans, but in any event there are sufficient brown americans to cover the field.

i'd like to be rude about zionism, too, but even jews are not allowed to go there. so we must rely on muslims to complain, and their complaints are discounted as anti-semitic. this is rich, since the muslims tend to be genuine semites, while the israelis tend to be the children and grandchildren of european invaders.

but i can complain about destroying iraq, laying waste to afghanistan, and planning to invade iran, if they are not starved into submission.

so, mr de vega, it's not just racism that characterizes america, or even primarily racism. america the beautiful is inhabited by a nation of orcs.
It's a form of murder.
Thank you for this brave reminder.
Rated
It's a form of murder.
Thank you for this brave reminder.
Rated
Al,
Are we really going to talk about Zionism? OK, I guess.

I won't claim to represent people other than myself on this, certainly not Chauncey, but it depends on what you're saying.

I've only been to Israel once. It was in 1980, before the final waves of Soviet immigration and, at that point and only at that point, the majority of Israel's Jews were actually not European; they were Middle Eastern. Incidentally, that's exactly when Labor was replaced by the far more right wing Likud.

I want to avoid hijacking the post. Here's the extremely short version; again, I'm speaking for myself, though I know other Jews on OS who would agree with what I'm about to say.

If you're talking about Europeans vs. Middle Easterners, keep in mind that Palestine/Israel hasn't had a Muslim majority, to my knowledge,, in centuries. The couple of snapshots I know about, one a sort of census done in the late 1600's and the other a census from a little before WWI, both show Jews outnumbering Muslims. Jews weren't the only people immigrating.

More Jews came to Israel from Middle Eastern countries, in most cases either driven out or actually forced out, than Muslims left Israel, voluntarily and involuntarily combined.

The discussion is very different if you're complaining about Israel's conduct from if you're complaining about Israel's existence in the first place.

Criticizing Israel is fine, a lot of Zionists do it constantly. What isn't fine is holding Israel to one standard while holding the rest of the region to another. That will get you accusations.

I'm spending too much time on a tangent. I'm not trying to drive the discussion to Israel; I'm just answering you relatively briefly. For me, this is brief.
Al,
Are we really going to talk about Zionism? OK, I guess.

I won't claim to represent people other than myself on this, certainly not Chauncey, but it depends on what you're saying.

I've only been to Israel once. It was in 1980, before the final waves of Soviet immigration and, at that point and only at that point, the majority of Israel's Jews were actually not European; they were Middle Eastern. Incidentally, that's exactly when Labor was replaced by the far more right wing Likud.

I want to avoid hijacking the post. Here's the extremely short version; again, I'm speaking for myself, though I know other Jews on OS who would agree with what I'm about to say.

If you're talking about Europeans vs. Middle Easterners, keep in mind that Palestine/Israel hasn't had a Muslim majority, to my knowledge,, in centuries. The couple of snapshots I know about, one a sort of census done in the late 1600's and the other a census from a little before WWI, both show Jews outnumbering Muslims. Jews weren't the only people immigrating.

More Jews came to Israel from Middle Eastern countries, in most cases either driven out or actually forced out, than Muslims left Israel, voluntarily and involuntarily combined.

The discussion is very different if you're complaining about Israel's conduct from if you're complaining about Israel's existence in the first place.

Criticizing Israel is fine, a lot of Zionists do it constantly. What isn't fine is holding Israel to one standard while holding the rest of the region to another. That will get you accusations.

I'm spending too much time on a tangent. I'm not trying to drive the discussion to Israel; I'm just answering you relatively briefly. For me, this is brief.
Al,
Are we really going to talk about Zionism? OK, I guess.

I won't claim to represent people other than myself on this, certainly not Chauncey, but it depends on what you're saying.

I've only been to Israel once. It was in 1980, before the final waves of Soviet immigration and, at that point and only at that point, the majority of Israel's Jews were actually not European; they were Middle Eastern. Incidentally, that's exactly when Labor was replaced by the far more right wing Likud.

I want to avoid hijacking the post. Here's the extremely short version; again, I'm speaking for myself, though I know other Jews on OS who would agree with what I'm about to say.

If you're talking about Europeans vs. Middle Easterners, keep in mind that Palestine/Israel hasn't had a Muslim majority, to my knowledge,, in centuries. The couple of snapshots I know about, one a sort of census done in the late 1600's and the other a census from a little before WWI, both show Jews outnumbering Muslims. Jews weren't the only people immigrating.

More Jews came to Israel from Middle Eastern countries, in most cases either driven out or actually forced out, than Muslims left Israel, voluntarily and involuntarily combined.

The discussion is very different if you're complaining about Israel's conduct from if you're complaining about Israel's existence in the first place.

Criticizing Israel is fine, a lot of Zionists do it constantly. What isn't fine is holding Israel to one standard while holding the rest of the region to another. That will get you accusations.

I'm spending too much time on a tangent. I'm not trying to drive the discussion to Israel; I'm just answering you relatively briefly. For me, this is brief.
Chauncey DeVega is a fool who is using the tragedy of two biracial children drowning during Hurricane Sandy to promote hypodescent and lies about the multiracial movement.

How the hell, DeVega, did "whites" reject the two biracial, white-skinned boys when they never even saw them! Oh, but you are a professional "race" huckster and need not make sense.

Tell me, DeVega, why Latinos and Arab-Americans can be nearly jet-black and jealous scum like you will take great pains to NOT call them "black"?
The answer to your second question is that Black isn't a designation of color, it's a designation of ethnicity. It's shorthand in the US for African, like White is shorthand for Caucasian, even though there are very light-skinned Asians and darker tanned Caucasians (such that there are some Asians lighter than some Caucasians). Actually, if you include Arabs and Indians as Caucasians, which racially they actually are, there are a whole lot of Causacians darker than a lot of East Asians.

But you knew that. You were looking for a club to swing; the merit of the case was entirely beside the point.
Chauncey your piece is moving and disturbing. Many claim that racism has almost "disappeared" in 2013. Yet the segregation in neighborhoods, between communities is glaring.
You are brave to speak the truth, as going down the "race road" elicits discomfort and often anger from others.
That poor mother and her kids. What WOULD have happened to them if their skin color were white? Sadly, I believe, they'd be alive today.
Chauncey your piece is moving and disturbing. Many claim that racism has almost "disappeared" in 2013. Yet the segregation in neighborhoods, between communities is glaring.
You are brave to speak the truth, as going down the "race road" elicits discomfort and often anger from others.
That poor mother and her kids. What WOULD have happened to them if their skin color were white? Sadly, I believe, they'd be alive today.
Chauncey your piece is moving and disturbing. Many claim that racism has almost "disappeared" in 2013. Yet the segregation in neighborhoods, between communities is glaring.
You are brave to speak the truth, as going down the "race road" elicits discomfort and often anger from others.
That poor mother and her kids. What WOULD have happened to them if their skin color were white? Sadly, I believe, they'd be alive today.
Chauncey your piece is moving and disturbing. Many claim that racism has almost "disappeared" in 2013. Yet the segregation in neighborhoods, between communities is glaring.
You are brave to speak the truth, as going down the "race road" elicits discomfort and often anger from others.
That poor mother and her kids. What WOULD have happened to them if their skin color were white? Sadly, I believe, they'd be alive today.
Chauncey your piece is moving and disturbing. Many claim that racism has almost "disappeared" in 2013. Yet the segregation in neighborhoods, between communities is glaring.
You are brave to speak the truth, as going down the "race road" elicits discomfort and often anger from others.
That poor mother and her kids. What WOULD have happened to them if their skin color were white? Sadly, I believe, they'd be alive today.
Chauncey your piece is moving and disturbing. Many claim that racism has almost "disappeared" in 2013. Yet the segregation in neighborhoods, between communities is glaring.
You are brave to speak the truth, as going down the "race road" elicits discomfort and often anger from others.
That poor mother and her kids. What WOULD have happened to them if their skin color were white? Sadly, I believe, they'd be alive today.
Chauncey your piece is moving and disturbing. Many claim that racism has almost "disappeared" in 2013. Yet the segregation in neighborhoods, between communities is glaring.
You are brave to speak the truth, as going down the "race road" elicits discomfort and often anger from others.
That poor mother and her kids. What WOULD have happened to them if their skin color were white? Sadly, I believe, they'd be alive today.
Chauncey your piece is moving and disturbing. Many claim that racism has almost "disappeared" in 2013. Yet the segregation in neighborhoods, between communities is glaring.
You are brave to speak the truth, as going down the "race road" elicits discomfort and often anger from others.
That poor mother and her kids. What WOULD have happened to them if their skin color were white? Sadly, I believe, they'd be alive today.
Chauncey your piece is moving and disturbing. Many claim that racism has almost "disappeared" in 2013. Yet the segregation in neighborhoods, between communities is glaring.
You are brave to speak the truth, as going down the "race road" elicits discomfort and often anger from others.
That poor mother and her kids. What WOULD have happened to them if their skin color were white? Sadly, I believe, they'd be alive today.
Chauncey your piece is moving and disturbing. Many claim that racism has almost "disappeared" in 2013. Yet the segregation in neighborhoods, between communities is glaring.
You are brave to speak the truth, as going down the "race road" elicits discomfort and often anger from others.
That poor mother and her kids. What WOULD have happened to them if their skin color were white? Sadly, I believe, they'd be alive today.
Chauncey your piece is an sad truth and you are brave to write about "unspoken" racial segregation in America's cities. I know topics on race often anger the dominant paradigm (they are uncomfortable; they are forced to look inside themselves at their own racism), and you are brave to dissect it.
And what WOULD have happened if the boys and their mother were white? It's easy to say "it wouldn't have made a difference," but the truth is, they'd have been rescued.
In a decade where people often say, "We have come so far and people aren't racist anymore," you beautifully and sadly point out the bullshit and pull the wool from their eyes. Thank you.
Chauncey your piece is an sad truth and you are brave to write about "unspoken" racial segregation in America's cities. I know topics on race often anger the dominant paradigm (they are uncomfortable; they are forced to look inside themselves at their own racism), and you are brave to dissect it.
And what WOULD have happened if the boys and their mother were white? It's easy to say "it wouldn't have made a difference," but the truth is, they'd have been rescued.
In a decade where people often say, "We have come so far and people aren't racist anymore," you beautifully and sadly point out the bullshit and pull the wool from their eyes. Thank you.
Chauncey your piece is an sad truth and you are brave to write about "unspoken" racial segregation in America's cities. I know topics on race often anger the dominant paradigm (they are uncomfortable; they are forced to look inside themselves at their own racism), and you are brave to dissect it.
And what WOULD have happened if the boys and their mother were white? It's easy to say "it wouldn't have made a difference," but the truth is, they'd have been rescued.
In a decade where people often say, "We have come so far and people aren't racist anymore," you beautifully and sadly point out the bullshit and pull the wool from their eyes. Thank you.
Chauncey your piece is an sad truth and you are brave to write about "unspoken" racial segregation in America's cities. I know topics on race often anger the dominant paradigm (they are uncomfortable; they are forced to look inside themselves at their own racism), and you are brave to dissect it.
And what WOULD have happened if the boys and their mother were white? It's easy to say "it wouldn't have made a difference," but the truth is, they'd have been rescued.
In a decade where people often say, "We have come so far and people aren't racist anymore," you beautifully and sadly point out the bullshit and pull the wool from their eyes. Thank you.
Chauncey your piece is an sad truth and you are brave to write about "unspoken" racial segregation in America's cities. I know topics on race often anger the dominant paradigm (they are uncomfortable; they are forced to look inside themselves at their own racism), and you are brave to dissect it.
And what WOULD have happened if the boys and their mother were white? It's easy to say "it wouldn't have made a difference," but the truth is, they'd have been rescued.
In a decade where people often say, "We have come so far and people aren't racist anymore," you beautifully and sadly point out the bullshit and pull the wool from their eyes. Thank you.
Chauncey your piece is an sad truth and you are brave to write about "unspoken" racial segregation in America's cities. I know topics on race often anger the dominant paradigm (they are uncomfortable; they are forced to look inside themselves at their own racism), and you are brave to dissect it.
And what WOULD have happened if the boys and their mother were white? It's easy to say "it wouldn't have made a difference," but the truth is, they'd have been rescued.
In a decade where people often say, "We have come so far and people aren't racist anymore," you beautifully and sadly point out the bullshit and pull the wool from their eyes. Thank you.
Chauncey your piece is an sad truth and you are brave to write about "unspoken" racial segregation in America's cities. I know topics on race often anger the dominant paradigm (they are uncomfortable; they are forced to look inside themselves at their own racism), and you are brave to dissect it.
And what WOULD have happened if the boys and their mother were white? It's easy to say "it wouldn't have made a difference," but the truth is, they'd have been rescued.
In a decade where people often say, "We have come so far and people aren't racist anymore," you beautifully and sadly point out the bullshit and pull the wool from their eyes. Thank you.
Chauncey your piece is an sad truth and you are brave to write about "unspoken" racial segregation in America's cities. I know topics on race often anger the dominant paradigm (they are uncomfortable; they are forced to look inside themselves at their own racism), and you are brave to dissect it.
And what WOULD have happened if the boys and their mother were white? It's easy to say "it wouldn't have made a difference," but the truth is, they'd have been rescued.
In a decade where people often say, "We have come so far and people aren't racist anymore," you beautifully and sadly point out the bullshit and pull the wool from their eyes. Thank you.
Chauncey your piece is an sad truth and you are brave to write about "unspoken" racial segregation in America's cities. I know topics on race often anger the dominant paradigm (they are uncomfortable; they are forced to look inside themselves at their own racism), and you are brave to dissect it.
And what WOULD have happened if the boys and their mother were white? It's easy to say "it wouldn't have made a difference," but the truth is, they'd have been rescued.
In a decade where people often say, "We have come so far and people aren't racist anymore," you beautifully and sadly point out the bullshit and pull the wool from their eyes. Thank you.
Chauncey your piece is an sad truth and you are brave to write about "unspoken" racial segregation in America's cities. I know topics on race often anger the dominant paradigm (they are uncomfortable; they are forced to look inside themselves at their own racism), and you are brave to dissect it.
And what WOULD have happened if the boys and their mother were white? It's easy to say "it wouldn't have made a difference," but the truth is, they'd have been rescued.
In a decade where people often say, "We have come so far and people aren't racist anymore," you beautifully and sadly point out the bullshit and pull the wool from their eyes. Thank you.
Chauncey your piece is an sad truth and you are brave to write about "unspoken" racial segregation in America's cities. I know topics on race often anger the dominant paradigm (they are uncomfortable; they are forced to look inside themselves at their own racism), and you are brave to dissect it.
And what WOULD have happened if the boys and their mother were white? It's easy to say "it wouldn't have made a difference," but the truth is, they'd have been rescued.
In a decade where people often say, "We have come so far and people aren't racist anymore," you beautifully and sadly point out the bullshit and pull the wool from their eyes. Thank you.
Chauncey your piece is an sad truth and you are brave to write about "unspoken" racial segregation in America's cities. I know topics on race often anger the dominant paradigm (they are uncomfortable; they are forced to look inside themselves at their own racism), and you are brave to dissect it.
And what WOULD have happened if the boys and their mother were white? It's easy to say "it wouldn't have made a difference," but the truth is, they'd have been rescued.
In a decade where people often say, "We have come so far and people aren't racist anymore," you beautifully and sadly point out the bullshit and pull the wool from their eyes. Thank you.
Chauncey your piece is an sad truth and you are brave to write about "unspoken" racial segregation in America's cities. I know topics on race often anger the dominant paradigm (they are uncomfortable; they are forced to look inside themselves at their own racism), and you are brave to dissect it.
And what WOULD have happened if the boys and their mother were white? It's easy to say "it wouldn't have made a difference," but the truth is, they'd have been rescued.
In a decade where people often say, "We have come so far and people aren't racist anymore," you beautifully and sadly point out the bullshit and pull the wool from their eyes. Thank you.
Chauncey your piece is an sad truth and you are brave to write about "unspoken" racial segregation in America's cities. I know topics on race often anger the dominant paradigm (they are uncomfortable; they are forced to look inside themselves at their own racism), and you are brave to dissect it.
And what WOULD have happened if the boys and their mother were white? It's easy to say "it wouldn't have made a difference," but the truth is, they'd have been rescued.
In a decade where people often say, "We have come so far and people aren't racist anymore," you beautifully and sadly point out the bullshit and pull the wool from their eyes. Thank you.
Chauncey your piece is an sad truth and you are brave to write about "unspoken" racial segregation in America's cities. I know topics on race often anger the dominant paradigm (they are uncomfortable; they are forced to look inside themselves at their own racism), and you are brave to dissect it.
And what WOULD have happened if the boys and their mother were white? It's easy to say "it wouldn't have made a difference," but the truth is, they'd have been rescued.
In a decade where people often say, "We have come so far and people aren't racist anymore," you beautifully and sadly point out the bullshit and pull the wool from their eyes. Thank you.
The woman being of color certainly did not help. Truth be told those folks would slam the door on anyone they did not know of any race

The further east you get in this country... the nastier people get.
"The white parentage through their father of those two beautiful black children . . . ."

That is absolutely surreal.