Samurai Yenta

Award-Winning Journalist, Author, Poet & Inspirational Writer

Francesca Biller

Francesca Biller
Location
San Francisco, California, United States
Birthday
February 02
Title
Author, Award-Winning Journalist, Poet, Short Stories, Humor and Art Culture
Bio
Award Winning Investigative Journalist, Edward R. Murrow recipient, Author, Essayist, Humorist, Poet ____________________________________ Art & Culture, Politics, Multicultural Issues & Identity, Philosophy of Parenting, Humor & Happiness, Inspiration, Female Empowerment, Food & Family, Japanese, Hapa & Multiracial History, Poetry _____________________________________ Published: The Japanese American National Museum, The Huffington Post, My Jewish Learning, The Chicago Sun Times, ElephantJournal.com, Jewish Journal of Los Angeles, Be'schol Lashon, Parents.com, Empowering Parents.com, Lakeview House International Journal- Poetry, The Jewish News Weekly ofSan Francisco, USA on Race.com, Discover Nikkei.org, Senses Magazine, Interfaithfamily.com Babyzone.com, The Syndicated News, ShalomLife.com, and others _____________________________________ Current & Latest: Speaker at "Mixed-Remixed Festival" for Discussion: "Global v. Universal: Otherness & Writing the Female Writer of Color" held at Japanese American National Museum __________________________________ "Samurai Yenta" a Blog about Japanese & Jewish Culture, food and humor for My Jewish Learning.com ___________________________________ Books to be published book for Ithaca Press, a compilation of authobiographically-based inspirational-themed essays and stories, and a collection of Poetry _____________________________________ Essays published in a series of Textbooks about multiculturalism called "Multiculturalism in America: Opposing Viewpoints." I am writing a book of poetry, as well as a compilation of short stories and essays ______________________________________ Radio & T.V. includes appearances on syndicated national talk radio programs, including for CBS Radio and others wherein I have discussed politics, parenting, anti-aging/health as well as comedy appearances about pop culture. _____________________________________ Journalism Awards: The Edward R. Murrow Award, 2 Golden Mike awards, 4 Society of Professional Journalists First awards and The Los Angeles Press Club. Awards were granted for Excellence in Reporting for both print and broadcast reporting. ______________________________________ Blogs & Sites : Open Salon.com I've Got Issues ---  www.francescabiller.org  The Elephant Journal The Huffington Post Samurai Yenta ____________________________________ Social Media Website: www.francescabiller.com Twitter @francescabiller  Facebook @francesca biller Facebook Writer/Fan Page - @francescabiller-humorist-writer-author

JANUARY 20, 2013 7:54PM

Obama, King and the Fear of the Intelligent Black Male

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There is nothing scarier for a racist than the prospect of a smart black man.

 

Someone has to say it.

 

While the Obama camp has been publicly conscious that the President might "ever" appear as the angry black male, with all of the ugly parables and historical conclusions that might imply, they failed to foresee that a job well done might cause racism to rear it's virile head that much more.

 

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was also conscious that his intelligence might be a threat to those who already saw him as less than and a danger to the larger culture because he was Black and because he was smart.  

 

And while ignorance may be bliss for some; blatant intellectualism and even a steady-handed demeanor may cause anything but bliss for a man of color.   

 

If anything, King's manner and method of non-violent civil disobedience, peaceful but prophetic protests, sermon-like messages of hope, and recognition that The Civil Rights movement was one that belonged to us all, and not just to Blacks, angered some people more than it did to fuel a positive following.

 

Perhaps one of the most prolific speeches of a generation, King delivered his I Have a Dream speech with palpable passion not yet heard before by a Black leader to such a mass audience. And yet his words were not angry, bitter or confrontational, though they rang true and they dug deep into the American conscience.

 

"But there is something that I must say to my people who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice. In the process of gaining our rightful place, we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred," from King's 'I Have a Dream' speech.

 

Like King, Obama has been OCD-precise to deliver his messages carefully, with absolute forethought and with a civility that often angers the hate masses that much more.

 

One doesn't need to dig too deep to find the fear-inspired outbursts and call to near-violent arms. Just look at some of our most famous and watched media darlings like Rush Limbaugh, Donald Trump, Bill O'Reilly and the scourge of all women, Ann Coulter.

 

The public eats up hate like a junkie happily finding its next fix, and what would normally be deemed as dangerous and intolerable for a sitting president is tolerated and glorified for this one.

 

Since Obama has become president, the number of racist hate groups, websites and blogs have risen dramatically.

 

According to The Southern Poverty Law Center, "For many extremists, president Obama is the new symbol of all that's wrong with the country- the Kenyan president, the secret Muslim who is causing our country's decline," said Mark Potak, senior fellow at the SPLC.

 

"The dramatic expansion of the radical right is the result of our country's changing racial demographics, the increased pace of globalization, and our economic woes," Potok said.

 

The SPLC reports that the most dramatic growth in hate groups are associated with The Patriot Movement, which are made up of armed militias and other "conspiracy-minded organizations that see the federal government as their primary enemy." For the third straight year in a row, these groups saw their numbers skyrocket in 2011, this time by 55 percent.

 

The evidence is in. 

 

Go ahead and tell me when a white incumbent president was relentlessly questioned about his Birth Certificate, about his academic records, and appallingly called un-American because his father was born on a distant shore.

 

Millions of Americans have parents who were born in other countries, but Barack is the first President to serve a sentence of sinister and outright intervention for experiencing that same American dream.

 

It's because he's got some black in him, end of story.

 

If President Barack Hussein Obama were a white male, he would not have to endure such scurrilous, heinous and outrageous charges.

 

Just no way in hell.

 

And race has everything to do with it.

 

What Obama, his staff and his supporters never saw coming was just how threatened many people would be by his calm assurance, diligent allegiance to the office of the Presidency, and his long list of accomplishments that would have made either of the Bush presidents immortal Kings.

 

Retired Army Col. Lawrence Wilkerson, Colin Powell's former chief of staff, recently condemned the Republican party and said "My party is full of racists."

 

"My party, unfortunately, is the bastion of those people-- not all of them, but most of them-- who are still basing their positions on race," said Wilkerson.

 

"Let me just be candid: My party is full of racists, and the real reason a considerable portion of my party wants President Obama out of the White House has nothing to do with the content of his character, nothing to do with his competence as commander-in-chief and president, and everything to do with the color of his skin, and that's despicable."

 

That's just why---  the more the President does for the country, the angrier racists and fear-based voters and constituents become.

 

According to a recent CNN poll that asked whether or not people wanted to see the President succeed or fail, 52% of Republicans reported that they wanted to see him fail, compared to 23% of Independents.

 

The scariest aha moment is how many people still can't handle the idea of a smart and capable Black president. 

 

Hence the support of a Herman Cain by the Republican party, as they propped him up as the 999 joke that he was, while all swifty-eyed and smiling as they offered him up as a token black leader . . .  while knowing full-well that he was anything but smart or capable of leadership on any imperative or national scale.

 

Black folks know about this all too well. Not unlike women, they learn early on to play a little dumb, never to outsmart their masters, and to lay low, real low.

 

That's only of course if they want to get on by, in the beginning and for the long run.

 

I recall my early days while interning at several major media corporations when I was flat-out told by both women and male superiors not to be too ambitious and never outsmart my colleagues.

 

This would make me not only unpopular real fast, but might even get me fired.

 

But for the black man, it's worse.

 

Any loud or strong opinions may be taken as angry, uppity or even as a form of violence.

 

Slave holders used to whip their black slaves often just for fun, when they thought their slaves had an attitude of defiance, or for no reason at all.

 

Black slaves have also written about being beaten and tortured if they appeared smart, equal in any conscious or unconscious way, and therefore often acted less intelligent than even the animals they were forced to take care of, for fear of death.

 

Old newspaper clippings, plays, advertisements and historical accounts reveal only a few characteristics of the black man, not one who was beloved or necessarily even tolerated.

 

There was the defiant black man of course, who had to be whipped into submission because he might become violent, like his owner.

 

There was the stupid black slave, who could barely speak English or much of anything else, and only jabbered here and there.

 

And there was the docile black servant, who even joked along with his master, for the hopes of more than mere survival, dreaming that he might even realize freedom one day.

 

Like Obama, I am also half-white and I have a Hawaiian Birth Certificate.

 

I also attended a high school near his and might have even shared the same old rickety-racked school bus known as The Express that transported many of us mixed-race kids through the multicultural neighborhoods of Honolulu.

 

As a Japanese Jew during the 1970's, you can bet that I faced my share of taunts, bullying and name-calling by other kids.

 

I was called a half-breed

 

I was also labeled as a traitor by kids who prided themselves on being full-breeds of both races that I apparently shared only "half the glory" with.

 

But I grew up after the battles, blood and tears of The Civil Rights movement, and I somehow believed that the days of social, institutional and political racism were far and in between.

 

But I was wrong and it won't be the first time, and now I am not so young and have experienced much racism and bigotry first hand, and more than I care to admit.

 

But in the case of President Obama, there are a few points I do care to admit  . . .

 

Had he been white and was responsible for the killing of Osama bin Laden . . .

 

For ending the War in Iraq . . .

 

For saving the American auto industry from financial ruin and demise. . .

 

Had helped to insure millions of the middle and lower class . . .

 

Was responsible for creating more jobs in 2010 alone than Bush did in eight years . . .

 

Visited more countries and met with more world leaders than any previous president during his first six months in office . . . 

 

Funded The Department of Veterans Affairs with an extra $1.4 billion to improve Veterans' services . . .

 

Reformed student loan programs to make it possible for student to refinance at a lower rate . . . 

 

And I could go on  . . . 

 

And if the president had no "colored" in him . . .

 

Any incumbent would have been a shoe-in for a second term no doubt during his reelection campaign and would have been nowhere close to any candidate in any goddamn poll in any goddamn swing state, certainly not close to a Mitt Romney.

 

Ta-Nehisi Coates, a senior editor at The Atlantic, who also happens to be Black and American, wrote about this issue in an essay entitled "Fear of a Black President."

 

In his much lauded and controversial article, Coates wrote:

 

"Part of Obama’s genius is a remarkable ability to soothe race consciousness among whites. Any black person who’s worked in the professional world is well acquainted with this trick. 

But never has it been practiced at such a high level, and never have its limits been so obviously exposed. This need to talk in dulcet tones, to never be angry regardless of the offense, bespeaks a strange and compromised integration indeed, revealing a country so infantile that it can countenance white acceptance of blacks only when they meet an Al Roker standard."

 

There are many angry voters who disguise their racism in cloaks of rhetoric and assumed sensibility.

 

There are also many ignorant believers who somehow confuse hatred by much of the right wing Republican party as passion and down-home sensibility.

 

But it's really all about fear. That's what racism is all about.

 

When you get people to fear, it a seed that grows much uglier and with more powerful roots than feelings such as positivity, faith and hope.

 

Fear is more often the greatest motivator for a countless lists of evils that human beings do and do not do.

 

Racism still exists.

 

And the fear of the Capable Black man is now much more prevalent than the fear of the Angry Black man.'

 

And while this may be one of the most politically incorrect posts you will read . . .

 

I hope it makes you angry, I hope it makes you think, and I even hope that it makes you cry.

 

Frederick Douglass, a Black man who was born a slave and later became a social reformer, a Republican statesman, and leader of the abolitionist movement, once said:

 

"No man can put a chain about the ankle of his fellow man without at least finding the other end fastened about his own neck."

 

And not long before his death, Martin Luther King Jr. said . . .

 

"In the End, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends."

 

Remember that illustrious and illustrative quote that still says so much about our culture.

 

It can only do us well.

 

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Comments

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I am a proud American who looks forward to watching President Barack Obama at the inauguration, along with his lovely family
You might add handsome to the list– extra irksome for portly old lumps like Cheney/Rove/Limbaugh when women of all colors swoon at the sight of him.

As a smart woman, are you surprised? Haven't you been hearing this all your life? That you're "too smart", been warned not to act smarter than a man? I guess we did not listen, and neither did he.
greenheron, I am actually "not surprised" and yet, as a woman and a journalist, I am surprised that it is a subject not revealed nearly enough. I suppose that sometimes we just have to say what it obvious--- "out loud," Thank you for reading and comnenting.
I agree with everything here. And yes, we are the most racist nation in the world mainly because of Protestantism and its backward and fundamentalist subdivision: Evangelicalism.

What really pisses me off is how the media downplays the utter disrespect of the president, especially that coming from the wingnuts. Obama will always be the most disrespected American president at home, and that is a shame. Not long ago, everyone was scared to death from Bush and Cheney. I strongly believe that Obama supporters must ATTACK those who disrespect the President...harshly, especially in a country where contempt is admired as was clearly demonstrated by Bush and Cheney.

A fine article, Francesca. I noticed you posted over it. Please, remember this one and repost it later. R
Thoth, I greatly appreciate your comments, and I will :)
Seer, your fine words and comments are greatly appreciated and felt. Truly and thank you