JULY 27, 2009 10:10PM

You Know What I Just Realized Our Apartment Is Like?

Rate: 18 Flag
Tinkerbell Waiting

 

Here, at last, is the long-ago–promised Tinkerbell post. It was written almost two months ago, before we had formalized our lettering system. We apologize in advance for the extreme metaness of this post.


Tinkerbell Bw (scratching nails down sliding glass door)

Melissa Bw Oh my gosh. She has the most irritating way of getting attention possible.

Michael Bw She’s a genius.

Melissa Bw We’re gonna have to stop feeding her.

Michael Bw But she always seems so starving.

Melissa Bw Don’t her real Mama and Daddy ever feed her?

Michael Bw I wonder what happened to her sister. I never see her anymore.

Melissa Bw I was thinking the same thing a while back. I thought maybe she just likes to stay indoors, or maybe the couple separated and split the kitties up.

Michael Bw Possible. Hopeful.

Melissa Bw Yes, I have to think of happy reasons why we haven’t seen her.

     (H) I always think it’s funny that we think a couple splitting up is happy, hopeful here.

Michael Bw(H) Hahaha!

     (H1) I said three “Haha”s, but that would actually be, “Haha Haha Haha!”

     (H1) Hahahahahaha!

     This is becoming morose.

     See what happens when we give up subjects?

     (N) This happened so long ago. I would never talk about subjects now, love.

Melissa Bw(N) I know. I was just about to interject with an explanation. I—

Michael Bw(N) No! No explanations.

(later)

Michael Bw You know what I just realized our apartment is like? A miniature junkyard. Let me be more specific. It’s like the scene of all these miniature junkyards. Like a miniature junkyard museum.

     (H) I still feel like a giant every time I look at these diecast cars. I mean, I don’t know what the scale difference is between them, exactly.

     (I) Okay, I think we need to clarify, because I don’t want people thinking I’m having trouble distinguishing between this HotWheels car and a full-sized car. No, no. These are small-scale versions of—and we’ll have to verify this—a 1/24 scale version of show cars designed by Tom Daniel.

Melissa Bw(J) What you’re saying here is even more confusing to me, so I don’t know if it’s going to be very helpful to our reader.

Tinkerbell Bw(J) (head pendulating)

Michael Bw(J) Tinkerbell’s back. She’s trying to peek around the swinging vertical blind.

Melissa BwMichael Bw(J) (laughing)

Michael Bw(J) We’ve lost it.

     (H) And even accounting for the normal difference between what you perceive as an adult and what you perceived as a child—in other words, that fence out front that you looked up at when you were a child and thought was so high, to you as an adult might just break over your knees.

Melissa Bw(B) Which would make you a really tiny child!

Michael Bw(B) Melissa. Children are this tall! (holding hand about two feet off the ground)

     (J) Okay, I’m not going to say, “Children are this tall.” That’s the stupidest thing I’ve ever heard! Children only coming in one size.

Melissa Bw(B) That would make them a toddler.

Michael Bw(A) [ . . . might just break over your knees.] A completely different interpretation of the same thing that you’re looking at. The only difference is that you’ve grown up. You’re now physically taller.

     (K) What’s that bracket business? I am just mystified every time you read it.

Melissa Bw(K) I’m about to explain it!

     (G) Okay, I’ve sort of just introduced a new convention. If one of our asides from the future interrupts what we’re in the middle of saying, and it’s too hard to figure out what’s being said when you jump into the next part, we can bracket the last part of what was said before the interruption at the beginning of the part where it picks up. Does that sound okay?

Michael Bw(G) Guess so.

     (K) Yeah, it sounds good, but I have absolutely no idea what it means! I mean, you’d have to read that again a couple times. Did you actually say that? This is insane.

Melissa Bw(K) It’s only confusing because I’m reading it out loud to you, and you’re not looking at the actual brackets. If you were reading it, it would be obvious.

Michael Bw(K) Really? Because when you’ve read it, and you’ve read it out a couple of times, I keep thinking, “What does this mean?”

Melissa Bw(G) Okay, good.

Michael Bw(A) I think I’ve figured it out. I think they’re one-and-a-half times smaller. So that means it would make it seem to me like I’m one-and-a-half times bigger. So if I’m six feet, one-and-a-half times bigger would make me nine feet tall! And so I’m looking at this little car, and I’m saying, “How the hell did I get so big?”

(a bit later)

Michael Bw I have a life of the imagination. When I’m sitting somewhere, I’m not there. I’m somewhere else. I may be in the middle of a piece of code, trying to figure out why it’s not working. Or I may be in a story, seeing what the protagonist will do next. Or I may even be earlier in the day, thinking about how something could have gone so much better.

Melissa Bw So when you’re there in that moment, you’re not there.

Michael Bw Right.

Melissa Bw But, when you’re there later, in your head, you’re THERE!

Michael Bw Right! When I just discussed it now, I’m discussing the time there, and I find myself transported back to that time. Now, here’s the funny thing. That time didn’t really exist. There was no there to go back to. It’s ’cuz I imagined the time itself as just an aspect of a story I was creating in my own mind to place myself in a something—

     Wow, I just had that in my mind. And then it vaporized.

Melissa Bw That’s ’cuz you realized you were on.

Michael Bw Maybe. . . . Darn it. Oh well.

Melissa Bw I can read it back to you!

     (reads back)

Michael Bw Yeah! That is exactly where I was. Very good.

     So there are definitely certain benefits to this, to record exactly what we were saying. But the pauses that are necessary to capture it can sometimes become distracting. Admittedly, though, it lets you think a little more quickly on your feet.

     (C) I got an experiment for us to do.

Melissa Bw(C) What?

Michael Bw(C) The next time the birdies are fussing, we turn on the downstairs bathroom fan and see if it calms them down.

Melissa Bw(C) How come?

Michael Bw(C) Well, because I realized I had left the downstairs bathroom fan on almost all day, forgetting about it, and the birdies were uncharacteristically quiet. When I would check on them, they would just be sitting there happily snoozing or preening or whatever—

     (C) If we’re going to keep doing this, we’ll need to get you one of those court recorder machines.

Melissa Bw(C) Court reporter machines?

Michael Bw(C) Court recorder.

Melissa Bw(C) Court re-port-er. Yeah, but then I’d have to learn that technology—isn’t it different from the standard keyboard?

Michael Bw(C) Yeah. It’s not a court recorder? ’Cuz then you could be confused with a reporter from a newspaper or something. “Yeah, I’m a court reporter. I report from the court.”

Melissa Bw(C) (reads from Wikipedia) “A court reporter, stenotype reporter, voice writer or stenomask writer”—

Michael Bw(C) Yeah, that’s that thing we’re seeing in The Sweet Hereafter—a stenomask.

Melissa Bw(C) And it’s always so perplexing to watch, it really distracts from the scene ’cuz it’s so bizarre-looking.

Michael Bw(C) Yes, it does surprise me that Atom would put it there, especially at that moment.

Melissa Bw(C) Well, like he said in one of his interviews, he was just being authentic. That’s the way the setup would be in a standard deposition.

Michael Bw(C) Okay, I know. But it’s like how a GUI is most perfect when it is most transparent to the user.

Melissa Bw(C) Yes, so you actually have to fake some things to make it seem more real.

Michael Bw(C) Dang it, I’ve got the hiccups!

Melissa Bw(C) I know! I was just about to tell you to drink some water upside-down.

Michael Bw(C) I don’t, I try not to do that. Because all those water-drinking techniques just end up making me have a bursting tummy and hiccups.

Melissa Bw(C) You just aren’t doing it right.

Michael Bw(C) Well, my hiccups are gone now. And I didn’t have to do any technique. Seems like if you catch them quickly enough before they have a chance to set in that rhythm of theirs, then you can actually kind of carefully—hmm. This is hard to describe—

Melissa Bw(C) So it is a technique?

Michael Bw(C) I suppose. Perhaps I just haven’t examined it before. I mean, I used to use a technique that I could tell you about. It was something I laughingly called “willing them away,” where you tense every muscle of your upper body while holding your breath. It seems like all the best techniques involve something about breathing. It probably has something to do with—well, I don’t know. Who knows? I don’t know. You know. I think we may have slightly gotten off track, again.

Melissa Bw(C) Okay, so we went from the bizarre stenographer in The Sweet Hereafter

Michael Bw(C) Yes.

Melissa Bw(C) To the transparent GUI.

     (C) And then I said something about having to fake something to make it look real—which I was really still thinking about that scene from The Sweet Hereafter. In other words, I was saying, in order to make the scene more transparent—like you’re saying occurs in a good GUI—

Michael Bw(C) Okay.

Melissa Bw(C) Atom would have had to fake the scene a bit. I mean, remove the bizarre stenographer or take away that mask and replace it with some more traditional-looking court-reporting equipment.

     (F) I realize this is funny what I’m saying. That a director would have to “fake” a scene—as if what he’s doing isn’t already faking it. But he really is trying to capture the situation as authentically as possible, so what I mean is he would intentionally have to make it not as authentic in order to make it more believable to people. Like how in that early radio program, they used a real pistol shot, and people laughed at it because it sounded ridiculous. Like caps going off. So they started using special effects to make it sound like how we expect it to sound.

Michael Bw(C) That wouldn’t be necessary. All that would be needed is some introductory scene earlier in the film where we see this court reporter getting her equipment out, then setting up so that toward the end when this occurs, we are not so distracted by this odd-looking thing.

     (C) Okay now, for instance, this—

Tinkerbell Bw(C) Meow!

Michael Bw(C) (to Tinkerbell) Whatchyoudoin’?

     (C) Contrast this with the burning easy chair in
Box of Moonlight.

     (K) Now, do you think we need to indicate that I’m saying this part to you?

Melissa Bw(K) No—

Michael Bw(K) That would be funny to think that I would be saying that line to Tinkerbell.

Tinkerbell Bw(C) Meooow!

Michael Bw(C) (to Tinkerbell) Bad girl.

     (C) That’s another remarkable scene. But it doesn’t throw us off at all, it’s just incorporated into what we see. In the director’s commentary, DeCillo said this is something that was just occurring—he didn’t start the fire himself.

Melissa Bw(C) I wonder how aware he was of how perfect a symbol that easy chair was for Al’s transformation—from the staid, reliable, hardworking Al Fountain to the more playful, wild, and even a bit dangerous Al under the influence of the Kid.

Michael Bw(K) Wait a minute. Did you say “dangerous”?

Melissa Bw(K) I meant “dangerous” in the sense of—

Michael Bw(K) I would just say “reckless,” he became more reckless. That’s all. He became more of a thrillseeker, but he probably ended up settling back into his life somewhat. There’re still these aspects of it—I’m not sure. Like things unaddressed.

     (L) Who are we talking about?

     (L) Is this the next thread? Oh my God.

     (L) Melissa. “(L)” . . . “(M)”—we’re only one away from halfway through the alphabet! I thought we agreed that if we get to “(M)”, we’ve gone too far.

Melissa Bw(L) Oh no! You can’t say that.

Michael Bw(L) Why not?

Melissa Bw(L) Because I accidentally skipped the “(D)”s and now we have to go back and adjust all the letters, so what you’re referring to as “(L)” is actually “(K)”—

Michael Bw(L) Oh, I see!

     (L) So it’s only one back. We’re two away.

     (L) Still. Help us.

Tinkerbell Bw(C) Meow! Meoow!

Michael Bw(C) (to Tinkerbell) What is it? You’re kidding. Do you realize what time it is? Don’t you need to go home? We’re gonna have to close the door. We’re gonna have to close the door. I just feel bad about it.

Tinkerbell Bw(C) (dragging claw down aluminum screen door frame)

Michael Bw(C) (to Tinkerbell) Don’t. Don’t. You must know how obnoxious that is.

     (C) Is there any way of landing this one back down to earth?

     (C) Does this ever get more than four layers deep? I hope not. We never get back to our original things.

     (E) What’re you doing?

Melissa Bw(E) Adding all the meta layers. We need to get them straight before . . .

Michael Bw(M) Okay, you will be making a very fatal error if you don’t keep the consistency.

     (M) Can you not say a “fatal” error? I wanna soften that. I’m saying that, but I guess I’m saying that in a programming way. I’m saying if you were to code that up the way it is, you would be producing a fatal error. Why? Because you would be producing an error that would cause the program to no longer work.

     (M) We must finish this post.

Melissa Bw(M) I got it!

Michael Bw(M) Wow. You said that like Charlie! I hope it’s as good as a golden ticket.

Melissa Bw(M) Um, no. But I realize the missing “(D)” is going to be like the missing thirteenth floor in a hotel building. It’s really technically there. I mean the thirteenth floor doesn’t cease to exist just because it’s called the fourteenth floor.

Michael Bw(M) Okay, I see where you’re going with this. But to me, that’s just us being lazy. I mean yes, there may be a ton of these that have to be changed, but we’re using a text editor. We can just replace them. It’s not that big of a deal. This kind of stuff is done while programming all the time.

Melissa Bw(M) No, it’s not that. It’s that we’ve referred to specific letters—like this is “(J)” or this is “(L)”—

Michael Bw(M) Okay, first of all, we need to know what to call these. Because we keep saying threads. But I’m not sure that’s the right term. Maybe they should be called “passes.” They are passes through the text, and each letter represents a different pass. But is that technically accurate? Because before we finish the whole thing, we’ll already start metaing—“(A)”, “(B)”, “(C)” . . .

Melissa Bw(C) So after I said, “isn’t it different from the standard keyboard?”, what did you say?

Michael Bw(C) That’s too far back for me to remember.



L  E  G  E  N  D
letters = sequential meta conversations
                   (C occurred after B, B after A, etc.)
numbers = mini-meta tangents within meta conversations
quoted letters = prior meta conversations






















 

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I almost always end up laughing with delight when I read one of your posts, and this is no exception. Here's my contribution:

I read somewhere that cats carry a bacteria or something which acts on the brain of mice to not be afraid of cats, thus allowing the prey to be more easily caught. There is some supposition that it has an effect on humans which makes us want to feed them. Admittedly, the supposition could be mine, but it does make me look at our cats a bit suspiciously . . .

The conversation about scale reminds me of every time I've visited the towns where I grew up. It doesn't suprise me that the elementary school looks so small. It does suprise me that the high school looks/feels small, since I'm no taller than I was in high school.

Regarding time, have you read Vonnegut? He's got some interesting ideas about time, especially (I think) in "Slaughterhouse Five."
i like all the heads. and the meoow was nice. the ratcheting it up to red colour "e" was kind of exciting.
The thirteenth floor, Tinkerbell's sister kittie, her 'answering' meoows not understood, all 'understood' to be there yet not there; just like Michael and his imagination.

Thought provoking in ways that spiral off into metafinity for me. I am a huge fan of willing the hiccups away too. Much the same way as these realities 'exist' for us in this post - so can somthing 'with' us at the time (hiccups) be transported to the realm of 'understood' as there but not there.

I hope you don't think I've cracked yet another marble, but to me this is a graphical representation of our ability to trancend. From something Nabina pointed to the other day:

""If you want to become whole, let yourself be partial.If you want to become straight, let yourself be crooked.If you want to become full,let yourself be empty. If you want to be reborn, let yourself die. If you want to be given everything, give everything up." Tao Te Ching"

Perhaps if we want to experience the now, then we must understand the 'understood'. Thank you for this post, I've sincerely enjoyed it and the directions it streamed my thought patterns towards and away from.

peece!
dj
okay, you had me at KITTY!!!! i'm catless and it hurts. i Rated and i will come back later to read read read and comment. the AC is up and working!!! it's 99 degrees. fuck. plz read Part Two of the SEX post if you get a chance. i'm taking the pups to Rite Aid and then i'm going to the POOL to do my thang. lately i've been rocking out to country music. i'm a two step gal for some reason. :) so much lvoe lvoe lvoe lvoe love. and i got 50 ratings, finally, for part one of SEX after nagging like crazy. the point being to get that and surpass it since viciousness got 50 ratings right out of the gate. it's my Own Private Outrage. lvoe lvoe love and Gratitude and Beyond!!
Had me laughing.. Thanks for the laugh..
I read this while enjoying a smashing bus ride towards self discovery at a small lake north of somewhere south. Cats drinking catnip cocktails at seven with Burt Blyleven created chaos stunning John Tutturro. So I rate this slightly buzzed on catnip and swiss cheese.
There may still be a thirteenth floor but whatever number the last floor falls on is just a big fat lie isn't? We can't even have honesty in our architecture anymore. I think I'll just take the stairs.
What a ride. Great stuff as always.
i'm baaaaack!!! and i made it half way through so i'm feeling proud of myself. i LOVE the added colors, of course, being a color junkie. and i love the whole discussion of relative size. i've always adored miniatures and LOVE that you have those little cars. my thing was/still is a bit trains. story for another time. trains represent freedome for me. so i have trains in every shape and size. well, none that are Full Size. :) they make me so happy. henc ethe Catch My Train of Thought that Richard came up with. but the size of every train makes em so happy. and then you know im' a snow white junkie so i have all the snow white miniatures. i promise to psot photos soon!!! relaly motivated now. and i have Snow and Prince Charming Trolls. but i relaly get wht you're saying, michael, about size and scale. i'm looking at my trains on the shelves right now and feeling a little freaked that they are small, tiny, compared to Giant Me. well, it could be that or that i ran out of my generic Wellbutrin and i'm kind of tweaked. :) anyway, love lvoe lvoe and gratiude and you owe me a PM in response to my post about Ratigns, which you called delightful. no pressure, really. i just wanted to get your take on what i said. LOVE LOVE LVOE LOVE LOVE and HUGE GRATITUDE. oh, and i have a reall thing for Gulliver's Travels. i call my pups Poodies. short for Poodles. no idea why. and sometimes i call Ella Lilli-pood or Lilli-poot. the version of it that was on tv with Ted Danson was really good as i remember it. off to Netflix now. :)
It would be fun to hear sometime your impressions (report?) from inside an operational software program. Not the specifics that relate to its functionality or bugs, but the overall feeling of being "it", as if the software uses the human mind to articulate the experience for us :-)
No offense to Tinkerbell, but I am very allergic to cats and was a little wheezy reading this post. As a kid, I always thought being a court reporter (recorder) would be a cool job - just because I wanted to use one of those funny typing machines. Never even took a basic typing clss so that is one dream that died young. Sigh. I'm glad you have stopped worrying about subjects, it seems like your posts are at their free form best when they are subject-free.
Tinkerbell is so photogenic. And you've taken yet another wonderful photo - I love how she's expectantly to the side and viewed through the screen. Because she's a tortoiseshell cat and because it's his birthday and because all the "lovely life" posts made me think of it: Pied Beauty.

I once gave my Dad a father's day card that had a large billy goat and a smaller goat standing in front of a huge pile of junk, "Someday, kid, this will all be yours." I thought it was hilarious; he didn't so much.

Tinkerbell's importunate interruptions, Michael's hiccups, and the thirteenth floor felt like where you are and aren't. Scratching reminders, pointing arrows on the scenic map: "You are here", no, wait, "Are you here". I'm bumbling around my brain today, longing for the comforting whirr of a bathroom fan, perhaps, or some sense of a sweet hereafter. There are movies (The Sweet Hereafter is one of them) I could swear I saw or talked about with my mother, but later realize she'd been dead for years and years before the movie was made. It's a weird feeling. It's like a kind of dyslexic deja vu.
Rated for feline cuteness and, especially, the Box of Moonlight reference. One of my favorite movies ever!
okay, i'm hot despite N3's best efforts. he's adorable but the temp is only down 10 degrees. is that decent? it is 102. should i return him???? :( so im' visiting you guys because it's too freaking hot to go OUT and visit my local peep. the pups and i don't have as many fans as we did when we lived near Reed and Woodstock, but we have some. the fancy clothing store, the food co-op, starbucks -- but we prefer the local bakery except that there are often tiny children there (which means Trouble in River City). so we're visting you guys instead. i can't wait for your comment on my comments. god, you get excellent comments. i LOVE that people feel so inspired to share their stories with you two. nto so much on my posts. but most people don't admit to INTERSPECIES SEX. cowards. :)

the wonderpups are panting like crazy. i put ice cubes in their water but that doesn't cut it. my tiny ella is looking at me from her crate. shit, i need to give them a snack. that will get them to drink more water.

is it this hot in Ashland? i should have moved there. it's artsy, isn't it? damn my dead richard for having so many redneck relatives here. love lvoe love and gratitude. shit, why didn't i just PM you guys? no idea.
shit, it's 106!!! N3 is doing a good job, isn't he?
I did read this yesterday, and rated - most of it is beyond me, not sure I have a flair for 'reading' meta :) but the comments were interesting
sighted peacock family on the roof of the house opposite, one male did the 'raise your plume and dance for the lady' movement. It made me sad as the lady he was trying to court kept turning away from him and I wanted to lift him up in my arms and say, "it's ok, beta, there will be others, get on with feeding and go play" the rest were busy eating, he was following this one around while she fed!
Yes, Rolling is right. The comments are as thought-provoking as the post itself, which is very entertaining. I like meandering. I saw the Sweet Hereafter and don't remember the recorder mask. BTW, now court-reporting pays big because you can also do closed captioning with the training you get. You don't type, it's kind of like Gregg shorthand (I'm really old) on a different kind of keyboard. I would like to do closed-captioning. No I wouldn't. Why do I say things like that.
Thank you, everyone, for your thoughtful and inspiring comments! We are looking forward to responding to each of you individually, but we’ve gotten waylaid by other creative projects and we’re too sleepy to give your comments their proper due right now.

Nigh-night,

( m&m )
@Owl_Says_Who:

Owl_Says_Who: I almost always end up laughing with delight when I read one of your posts, and this is no exception.

Michael: We are always happy to learn one of our posts has brought laughter to someone (we all certainly need it). And “laughing with delight”? Owl, you made our day.

Owl_Says_Who: Here's my contribution:

Melissa: Thanks for joining in the conversation!

Owl_Says_Who: I read somewhere that cats carry a bacteria or something which acts on the brain of mice to not be afraid of cats, thus allowing the prey to be more easily caught.

Melissa: Interesting! I wonder how the cats get the bacteria into the mice before they catch them . . .

Michael: Maybe they spit at them.

Melissa: Hahaha.

Michael: (performing) Come’ere, mouse! . . . Patooey!

Owl_Says_Who: There is some supposition that it has an effect on humans which makes us want to feed them.

Michael: This reminds me of an absolutely hilarious site called Cat Dynamics.

Melissa: Yes! We probably came across it about ten years ago, but we’ve always remembered it because we laughed so hard.

Michael: The “Evil, EVIL!!!” comment in the testimonials section is particularly funny.

Owl_Says_Who: Admittedly, the supposition could be mine, but it does make me look at our cats a bit suspiciously . . .

Melissa: Yes, well there’s also that recent study about cats controlling us through their purring, so I think your suspicions are well-founded.

Owl_Says_Who: The conversation about scale reminds me of every time I've visited the towns where I grew up. It doesn't suprise me that the elementary school looks so small. It does suprise me that the high school looks/feels small, since I'm no taller than I was in high school.

Michael: Hmm, that is surprising.

Melissa: I wonder if that’s because you’ve become exposed and accustomed to larger spaces, more all-encompassing architecture as you got older? Did you grow up in a small town and move to a larger city? That could have something to do with altering your perception of size, as well.

Michael: I was thinking that maybe the mind has a way of expanding things in your memory. Or maybe the more you think of something, the larger it seems.

Melissa: Interesting. As if thought magnifies both conceptual and physical measurements in our mind.

Owl_Says_Who: Regarding time, have you read Vonnegut?

Michael: Read him?! Didn’t you hear, I’m his love child! And on top of that, we’re Bokonists!

Melissa: Hahaha. To answer your question, Owl, Michael actually went through a spell where he read every Vonnegut book in print (this was about fifteen years ago or so). We read Cat’s Cradle aloud together, and that’s still one of our favorites to this day. “Gott mate mutt.”

Michael: “Lucky me, lucky mud.”

Owl_Says_Who: He's got some interesting ideas about time, especially (I think) in "Slaughterhouse Five."

Michael: Yes. Coming unstuck in time. Especially interesting when you consider the protagonist’s last name: Pilgrim.

Melissa: Right, I hadn’t even really thought about him as being a pilgrim of time travel before. Funny thing is, he’s such an anti-hero, because he’s really quite nonchalant about it all. He doesn’t seize it as an opportunity for imperial conquest, but simply wafts along the wave of time like a children’s park ride.

Michael: Billy seems more like a bystander than a protagonist.

Melissa: Wow, well-put. So it goes.

Michael: Okay, someone had to say it.
@Patrick McEvoy-Halston:

“i like all the heads.”

Thank you, Patrick, and welcome to metaness!

“and the meoow was nice.”

We’ll pass that along to Tinkerbell :-)

“the ratcheting it up to red colour "e" was kind of exciting.”

That’s probably the most excitement you’ll get around here :-)

( m&m )
@David:

David: The thirteenth floor, Tinkerbell's sister kittie, her 'answering' meoows not understood, all 'understood' to be there yet not there; just like Michael and his imagination.

Melissa: Yes, I hadn’t thought of the connections among those—the palbably absent. And the ambiguous nature of “thereness.”

Michael: There’s a joke that when we die, there’s a room we go to, and everything we ever lost is there. When I was five years old, my grandfather brought home a little plastic box containing two Mexican jumping beans. I dropped one, and after spending some time looking for it, I had concluded that it had fallen through some mysterious hole in space. I can’t wait to see my little Mexican jumping bean!

Melissa: Hahaha!

David: Thought provoking in ways that spiral off into metafinity for me.

Michael: Spiral. Thoughts as galaxies. Galaxies in the metaness.

David: I am a huge fan of willing the hiccups away too.

Melissa: It never works for me. Guess my will isn’t strong enough.

David: Much the same way as these realities 'exist' for us in this post - so can somthing 'with' us at the time (hiccups) be transported to the realm of 'understood' as there but not there.

Melissa: Sounds like you’re getting into Newtonian territory, here. The nature of mind and matter.

David: I hope you don't think I've cracked yet another marble, but to me this is a graphical representation of our ability to trancend.

Michael: On the contrary, your depth of insight reveals a very ordered mind.

David: From something Nabina pointed to the other day: "If you want to become whole, let yourself be partial.If you want to become straight, let yourself be crooked.If you want to become full,let yourself be empty. If you want to be reborn, let yourself die. If you want to be given everything, give everything up." Tao Te Ching

Melissa: That reminds me of Jesus talking about he who wishes to save his life shall lose it. There’s a consistency of thought here about stepping outside our selfishness to choose something more profound.

Michael: I thought you were gonna say it reminded you of The Sphinx in Mystery Men.

Melissa: I thought of that, too!

Michael: It just didn’t seem appropriate.

Melissa: Right, I don’t want to be flippant about such—

Michael: But the thing is, I don’t think the movie does mock The Sphinx’s wisdom. Only one of the characters does, and he’s Mr. Furious.

Melissa: Yeah, but I suspect if the director had to choose one character he identified with the most, the one he probably would give the most truthful lines to, it would be the cynical Mr. Furious.

Michael: I would pick the Shoveler.

Melissa: Ah, William H. Macy’s character, yes. He’s the moral grounding, the unifier of the group.

David: Perhaps if we want to experience the now, then we must understand the 'understood'.

Michael: But isn’t understanding the understood impossible for the wise? Wisdom is knowing that we know nothing. But to understand the understood, which would require a boggling intelligence, would make it seem that to experience the now is impossible.

Melissa: Hmm, I suppose the attempt to understand the understood is the discipline of history.

Michael: Or the Tao?

Melissa: I don’t know—we’d have to ask Angie about that one. But I just realized this whole concept of understanding the understood is meta! It’s meta-understanding.

Michael: You’re right!

David: Thank you for this post, I've sincerely enjoyed it and the directions it streamed my thought patterns towards and away from.

Michael: You’re very welcome, David.

Melissa: And we’ve sincerely enjoyed your generous sharing of those streaming thought patterns. Thank you.
@Theodora:

Theodora: okay, you had me at KITTY!!!! i'm catless and it hurts.

:-) :-(

Theodora: i Rated and i will come back later to read read read and comment.

Melissa: Thank you, Theodora. We often do that, too. Ratings are always appreciated :-)

Theodora: the AC is up and working!!! it's 99 degrees. fuck.

Michael: 99 degrees?! Come on, N3T3! You can do better than that. Theodora needs you! You’re her only hope!

Theodora: plz read Part Two of the SEX post if you get a chance.

Melissa: We did :-) Very funny, as always.

Theodora: i'm taking the pups to Rite Aid and then i'm going to the POOL to do my thang.

Michael: At least you have a way of cooling off! Do the doggies get to swim, too?

Melissa: I was gonna ask the same thing!

Theodora: lately i've been rocking out to country music. i'm a two step gal for some reason. :)

Michael: Two-step is cool. Everyone has their own thang. But isn’t rocking out to country music an oxymoron? :-)

Theodora: and i got 50 ratings, finally, for part one of SEX after nagging like crazy.

Melissa: That’s quite a milestone—congratulations, Theodora!

Theodora: i'm baaaaack!!! and i made it half way through so i'm feeling proud of myself.

Michael: Considering the metaness of the post, that’s quite an accomplishment! I just thought of something. Isn’t talking about the metaness of something at metaness meta?

Melissa: Yes! It’s meta-metaness.

Theodora: i LOVE the added colors, of course, being a color junkie.

Michael: You were one of the inspirations behind us actually doing it!

Melissa: Yes, thank you, Theodora, for pressing us on that point :-)

Theodora: and i love the whole discussion of relative size. i've always adored miniatures and LOVE that you have those little cars.

Michael: I probably actually have more than just a thing for miniatures. I probably have an obsession about them. The following is a response I gave consonantsandvowels about what I believe is the source of my miniature mania:

“When I was very young, my grandmother took me to my “Aunt”’s house and while my grandma and her talked and smoked in the kitchen, I went into the bedroom and discovered a small clock containing an even tinier little man swinging a infinitesimal little hammer up and down while a fire glowed orange in the back. I was enthralled. I kept wishing I could shrink down and go inside that little scene the man was in. And that desire inspired me to want to make shadowboxes that would recreate that same sensation.”

Theodora: my thing was/still is a bit trains. story for another time. trains represent freedome for me. so i have trains in every shape and size. well, none that are Full Size. :) they make me so happy. henc ethe Catch My Train of Thought that Richard came up with. but the size of every train makes em so happy.

Michael: Me, too—from the moment my grandfather showed me his HO scale train layout in the garage, through the years I would sit in the library at school going through every scale train magazine they had, to today, when I see a video like this one of the SP 4449 crossing at Roberts, Oregon. Simply awesome.

Melissa: Yes! And I just realized that’s probably another reason you like The Station Agent so much, Theodora.

Michael: Well, she has a thing for Peter, remember.

Melissa: Haha!

Theodora: and then you know im' a snow white junkie so i have all the snow white miniatures.

Melissa: Yes, I grew up on classic Disney films. I was so particular about the quality of the animation, I refused to watch even some of the newer Warner Brothers cartoons—much less something as gauche as the Hanna-Barbera crap!

Michael: Now you’re a cartoon snob.

Melissa: Well, that was when I was about seven. I’ve only expanded on my aesthetic snobbishness since then.

Michael: Haha.

Theodora: i'm looking at my trains on the shelves right now and feeling a little freaked that they are small, tiny, compared to Giant Me.

Melissa: That reminded me of this scene from a hilarious Britcom called Big Train, where a planner is presenting a transportation proposal using a model train on a map.

Michael: The planner is bewildered by the city official, who constantly confuses the model with the real train and the map with the country.

Melissa: Right, and so the city official suddenly picks up the model train and is terrified to think she has become a giant.

Theodora: well, it could be that or that i ran out of my generic Wellbutrin and i'm kind of tweaked. :)

(both laughing)

Theodora: oh, and i have a reall thing for Gulliver's Travels. i call my pups Poodies. short for Poodles. no idea why. and sometimes i call Ella Lilli-pood or Lilli-poot. the version of it that was on tv with Ted Danson was really good as i remember it. off to Netflix now. :)

Michael: The surprisingly well-made animation of Gulliver’s Travels that would regularly show on something called Family Film Festival on Channel 5 in southern California—

Melissa: Yes! With Tom Hatten! At 3:00 on Sundays.

Michael: I think Saturdays, too. I’m almost positive I remember watching a Pippi Longstocking on that show on a Saturday.

Melissa: Yeah, that sounds familiar. I could very well have, too!

Michael: Anyway, that was something I enjoyed watching every time it came on.

Theodora: okay, i'm hot despite N3's best efforts. he's adorable but the temp is only down 10 degrees. is that decent? it is 102. should i return him???? :(

Michael: Well, it’s helping, but if you’re still uncomfortable, it’s not helping enough. Were there any other possibilities in that price range?

Melissa: The only problem is if you have to pay for the shipping—but I think Amazon actually gives you a prepaid shipping label if you fill out the return authorization, so don’t let that stop you.

Michael: Have you looked at the manual yet? Maybe there’s some kind of supercooling setting or something, but I’m just grabbing at straws here.

Theodora: we prefer the local bakery except that there are often tiny children there (which means Trouble in River City).

Melissa: Haha!

Theodora: god, you get excellent comments. i LOVE that people feel so inspired to share their stories with you two.

Melissa: Yes, we’re very blessed to have such thoughtful, sensitive, and creative friends.

Michael: We’ve said it before, but it’s true. We think of our comments as just a continuation of the conversation that went before it. Who knows? Maybe someday, we’ll be able to include others directly in our posts. That might be cool.

Melissa: That could be incorporated into that idea I had the other day.

Michael: The Mad Libs one? Sorry, metalibs?

Melissa: It’s sort of like that. More like a puzzle. Where we would post a bunch of scraps and then our readers would be invited to create their own meta post out of those scraps. And if they want, they can insert themselves into the conversation they create.

Michael: That was your idea?

Melissa: Yeah, except I just added the part about the reader contributing their own verse based on what you just said.

Theodora: nto so much on my posts. but most people don't admit to INTERSPECIES SEX. cowards. :)

Melissa: Yes, few people are as brave as you, Theodora :-)

Theodora: the wonderpups are panting like crazy. i put ice cubes in their water but that doesn't cut it. my tiny ella is looking at me from her crate. shit, i need to give them a snack. that will get them to drink more water.

Michael: Your poor doggies! That’s a good idea about the ice cubes in the water, though. Too bad it didn’t help.

Theodora: i should have moved there. it's artsy, isn't it?

Michael: Is it?

Melissa: Yes, of course! That’s one of the reasons we were inspired to move here.

Michael: Well, I was inspired to move here because on our way through, I said, “I wish we could live here. It reminds me of Big Bear.”

Melissa: The funny thing is, you were just saying the other day how it isn’t really like Big Bear that much at all.

Michael: Yeah, without the smell of the pines as a consant perfume, it’s not Big Bear.

Theodora: damn my dead richard for having so many redneck relatives here.

(both laughing, but feeling wrong about doing so)

Theodora: shit, it's 106!!! N3 is doing a good job, isn't he?

Michael: Wait! It’s 106 inside or outside?

Melissa: I think she means inside.

Michael: No. That’s too hot!

Melissa: Yes, that’s why she’s suffering so much! N3T3 may have to go bye-bye. But then you’ll be even hotter while waiting for a replacement :-(

Michael: Thank you for your thoughtful comments, Theodora. Sorry this is so long—

Melissa: Yeah. You’ll probably have to read our response in parts, too!

Michael: Hahaha.
@fireeyes24:

Had me laughing.. Thanks for the laugh..

That’s wonderful to hear, fireeyes. Thank you so much for letting us know, and welcome to metaland! It’s a privilege to brighten people’s lives.

( m&m )


@Mr. Mustard:

“I read this while enjoying a smashing bus ride towards self discovery at a small lake north of somewhere south.”

Oh, Splatch-ee Lake! And Dolores is just arriving in her airport shuttle, while the backwards-riding bicycle passes by.

“Cats drinking catnip cocktails at seven with Burt Blyleven created chaos stunning John Tutturro.”

You finally got us, oh conjurer of riddles! The Bert Blyleven allusion eludes us. Can you enlighten?

“So I rate this slightly buzzed on catnip and swiss cheese.”

Be careful, Mr. Mustard, recreational catnip use can lead to Swiss Cheese dependency.

Always a pleasure, Mr. M.,

( m&m )
@Tijo:

Tijo: There may still be a thirteenth floor but whatever number the last floor falls on is just a big fat lie isn't? We can't even have honesty in our architecture anymore. I think I'll just take the stairs.

Melissa: Hahaha. Good point.

Michael: That’s the problem with superstition. No logic or reason. Just pure fear. And there is a certain honesty to stairs, isn’t there?

Melissa: Maybe it has something to do with the work ethic.

Michael: Interesting, I didn’t even consider it from that angle.

Melissa: Well, I think Americans have this tendency to believe that the hard way is also often the more honest way—which in many cases, is actually true. The funny this is, the whole time Americans are thinking that, they’re also conniving about how to find the easiest way to do something. Get rich quick and all. The American Dream.

Michael: Thanks for joining in the conversation again, Tijo, and for making us laugh.


@micalpeace:

“What a ride. Great stuff as always.”

Thank you, micalpeace! Hope the ride wasn’t too bumpy. Always delighted to know you’ve stopped by.

( m&m )
@GalaxyMan:

GalaxyMan: It would be fun to hear sometime your impressions (report?) from inside an operational software program. Not the specifics that relate to its functionality or bugs, but the overall feeling of being "it", as if the software uses the human mind to articulate the experience for us :-)

Michael: What a great idea, GalaxyMan! I’ve already started imagining it. Hope to hear from the Narrator about it soon!

Melissa: Yes! Thank you for your faithful visits and inspiring comments, GalaxyMan.


@mamoore:

mamoore: No offense to Tinkerbell, but I am very allergic to cats and was a little wheezy reading this post.

Michael: Oh no! Sorry, mamoore. We’ll try to warn you next time it’s a kitty post.

mamoore: As a kid, I always thought being a court reporter (recorder) would be a cool job - just because I wanted to use one of those funny typing machines.

Melissa: Yeah, I can see how that would be intriguing. I remember how fun it was to use an old clunky typewriter when I was about eight. I typed up a fake newspaper with articles on topics such as our cat’s African safari and very mature headlines like “Pee Pee Falls.”

Michael: Wow! We haven’t progressed very much, have we? Wouldn’t it be funny to make one of our titles “Pee Pee Falls”?!

Melissa: Hahaha.

mamoore: Never even took a basic typing clss so that is one dream that died young. Sigh.

Melissa: Well, I think the calling you ended up with is pretty darn hard to beat as far as dreams go.

Michael: My first dream to die was to become an MP in the Army because my initials at the time were “MP” (I was four). I didn’t even know what a military police person did. I just saw that armband with “MP” on it and said, “Hey! Those are my initials. I’m gonna become an MP!” And I think I gave about the exact same amount of thought to becoming a Marine.

Melissa: Hahaha!

mamoore: I'm glad you have stopped worrying about subjects, it seems like your posts are at their free form best when they are subject-free.

Michael: We agree. We’ve definitely come a long way since our earliest posts.

Melissa: Yes, it’s nice to be free of the tyranny of subjects—and of having to devise the perfect system!

Michael: What a nightmare that was. Too bad it had to be public.

Melissa: Haha. Well, the worst one isn’t yet—the notorious art post has been perpetually postponed because it’s 90 percent meta and 10 percent content.

Michael: It’s worse than that. It’s 100 percent monstrosity. I really don’t believe we’ll ever get that into shape. I’m surprised we got this one into shape!

Melissa: I know, but that’s because we cut about half of the lines. Maybe if we cut three-quarters of the art post, it’ll finally be digestible.

Michael: That sounds easy!

Melissa: Haha. I know. It would be easier to make a new one.

Michael: Exactly.

Melissa: But I can’t! I’m not about to give up on all that work.

Michael: I know.
@consonantsandvowels:

consonantsandvowels: Tinkerbell is so photogenic. And you've taken yet another wonderful photo

Melissa: Thank you, consonantsandvowels. That was taken at the same time the last one was.

consonantsandvowels: I love how she's expectantly to the side and viewed through the screen.

Melissa: “expectantly” is a very good word for it :-)

consonantsandvowels: Because she's a tortoiseshell cat and because it's his birthday and because all the "lovely life" posts made me think of it: Pied Beauty.

Melissa: Gerard Manley Hopkins! One of my favorites. I didn’t know it was his birthday. Did you learn that from Writer’s Almanac?

consonantsandvowels: I once gave my Dad a father's day card that had a large billy goat and a smaller goat standing in front of a huge pile of junk, "Someday, kid, this will all be yours." I thought it was hilarious; he didn't so much.

(both laughing)

consonantsandvowels: Tinkerbell's importunate interruptions, Michael's hiccups, and the thirteenth floor felt like where you are and aren't.

Michael: Great minds. You and David noticed the same thing. That’s what’s so rewarding about these posts. We never know what to make of them until they’re done. And then, we’re not alone in our interpretation because all of you add to our understanding, as well.

consonantsandvowels: Scratching reminders, pointing arrows on the scenic map: "You are here", no, wait, "Are you here".

Melissa: To us, you are here—and there simultaneously.

Michael: This seems very futuristic.

Melissa: consonantsandvowels has come unstuck in time!

consonantsandvowels: I'm bumbling around my brain today, longing for the comforting whirr of a bathroom fan

Michael: I always have to have some sound going on in the background. A fan, the television, The Twilight Zone score. It’s an AS’y kind of thing.

Melissa: That reminds me of Warhol’s single that he would play over and over again while working. I wonder what that song was. That would be interesting to listen to.

Michael: I don’t know, but for some reason, I just thought of that greasy wig that was stuck in a manila envelope as part of a collection of all of the things that Andy owned, and the manila envelope itself was saturated with oil.

Melissa: Eeuuuh!

Michael: It was utterly disgusting. But because of his reputation—

Melissa: His celebrity.

Michael: Well that’s what I mean by reputation. And because of it, a greasy wig is history.

consonantsandvowels: perhaps, or some sense of a sweet hereafter. There are movies (The Sweet Hereafter is one of them) I could swear I saw or talked about with my mother, but later realize she'd been dead for years and years before the movie was made.

Melissa: Wow, discussing “The Sweet Hereafter” with your mom in the sweet hereafter.

Michael: Memories are squirrely things sometimes. I can be so sure something happened, only to later have it proven that it didn’t. But if our memories aid us toward healing, then even a false memory can be good.

Melissa: Who’s to say that it is false? Could’ve happened in a dream. Which isn’t necessarily false.

Michael: Even having a conversation with yourself in your own head is real.

Melissa: Right. Just because it isn’t vocalized doesn’t render it nonexistent.

Michael: And perhaps it was your mind, consonantsandvowels, manifesting what it most desired or needed. That conversation.

Melissa: Or maybe you’ve internalized your mother’s voice and being to the point that she does actually reside in you, partly, and that’s how you can continue having conversations with her.

Michael: Or perhaps we’re just reading way too much into this. Either way, as long as you don’t turn into Norman Bates, you’re fine.

Melissa: Haha.

consonantsandvowels: It's a weird feeling. It's like a kind of dyslexic deja vu.

Michael: I like that: “dyslexic deja vu.”

Melissa: Yes, me, too. Makes me think of The Matrix, although that’s an obvious synaptic connection. I bet everyone who’s seen it and who hears the words “deja vu” now thinks of that movie.

Michael: I think you’re right. As always, it’s been a wonderful conversation, consonantsandvowels.

Melissa: Yes! Thanks again for wending your way over.
@WanderingNotLost:

Melissa: What an honor to receive a comment from you! We know what a rare occurrence that is.

WanderingNotLost: Rated for feline cuteness and, especially, the Box of Moonlight reference. One of my favorite movies ever!

Michael: It is definitely one of our favorites, too. The transformation of Al Fountain is satisfying, but believable. And the Kid is a great film character.

Melissa: Yes, Sam Rockwell did a brilliant job, as usual.

Michael: I’m looking forward to seeing Moon. Is that out yet?

Melissa: Yeah, but probably not here. Like we ever go to the movies anyway. Like we even have time to watch our Netflix!

Michael: Thank you for stopping by, WanderingNotLost. (Great name, BTW.) We talk about movies often, so if you’re a movie . . . what did we decide on, love?

Melissa: Buff.

Michael: Right. So if you’re a movie buff, you’ll definitely pick up lots of movie recommendations.

Melissa: And we’d love to hear yours, too!
@Rolling:

“I did read this yesterday, and rated”

Thank you, Rolling!

“most of it is beyond me, not sure I have a flair for 'reading' meta :)”

We do apologize again for the heavy “meta”ness of this post. Since it’s an older piece, we were still hashing through a lot of our system, which can distract from the conversation itself. We’re trying to keep our new posts a little more straightforward (but they do develop lives of their own, so we can’t always control the metaness :-)

“but the comments were interesting”

That’s something we always appreciate, too.

“sighted peacock family on the roof of the house opposite, one male did the 'raise your plume and dance for the lady' movement. It made me sad as the lady he was trying to court kept turning away from him and I wanted to lift him up in my arms and say, "it's ok, beta, there will be others, get on with feeding and go play" the rest were busy eating, he was following this one around while she fed!”

What an absolutely beautiful story, Rolling! Thank you for sharing that profound moment with us through your poetic observations.

( m&m )
@latethink:

“Yes, Rolling is right. The comments are as thought-provoking as the post itself, which is very entertaining. I like meandering.”

So do we (but that’s obvious, from all the meta-meandering we do ;-)

“I saw the Sweet Hereafter and don't remember the recorder mask.”

It occurs during the depositions about the accident toward the end of the film.

“BTW, now court-reporting pays big because you can also do closed captioning with the training you get. You don't type, it's kind of like Gregg shorthand (I'm really old)”

Not that old! When I (Melissa) was little, I learned some Gregg shorthand because my mom was studying it. So we were able to write notes to each other in shorthand. I remember how cool it was making some of those swoopy symbols.

“on a different kind of keyboard. I would like to do closed-captioning. No I wouldn't. Why do I say things like that.”

You sound like us! We have too many interests and not enough lifetimes.

Always happy to see you here, latethink, and thanks for being a part of the conversation!

( m&m )
I was reading an article in the NYT and thought of your statement,

Melissa -Well, I think Americans have this tendency to believe that the hard way is also often the more honest way—which in many cases, is actually true. The funny this is, the whole time Americans are thinking that, they’re also conniving about how to find the easiest way to do something. Get rich quick and all. The American Dream.

"Today the average American spends a mere 27 minutes a day on food preparation (another four minutes cleaning up); that’s less than half the time that we spent cooking and cleaning up when Julia arrived on our television screens. It’s also less than half the time it takes to watch a single episode of “Top Chef” or “Chopped” or “The Next Food Network Star.” What this suggests is that a great many Americans are spending considerably more time watching images of cooking on television than they are cooking themselves — an increasingly archaic activity they will tell you they no longer have the time for."
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/02/magazine/02cooking-t.html?pagewanted=all
@Tijo:

Tijo: I was reading an article in the NYT and thought of your statement

Melissa: Thank you so much for taking the time and thought to share this with us!

Michael: Yes, this is a great connection, Tijo.

Tijo: What this suggests is that a great many Americans are spending considerably more time watching images of cooking on television than they are cooking themselves — an increasingly archaic activity they will tell you they no longer have the time for.

Michael: This makes me think of the time it dawned on me that I had never actually seen a rhino in person. I’d seen rhinos on television and in pictures, of course, but never actually with my own eyes. My whole impression of rhinos came from non-rhino things. This falseness, like watching cooking more than actually cooking, seems to be part of this media-induced pseudo reality that inhabits far too much of our minds.

Melissa: What’s interesting is I find I have the exact opposite problem. I spend so much time cooking, I don’t have time for all of the other things I need or want to do—least of all television (which is moot anyway since we haven’t watched TV in about three years). The only way I can justify spending so much time cooking is by listening to audiobooks at the same time, so I feel I’m accomplishing at least two things simultaneously. I have this streak of compulsive pragmatism that drives me to be as efficient as possible with every moment I spend doing something. Fortunately, I love both cooking and "ear-reading" (to borrow Theodora's term), so I've found a way to spend time enjoying activities I love without feeling too guilty about all the things I'm not doing instead.
If someone were to rub your shoulders while you cooked you could accomplish three things at once. I'm not naming any names but Tinkerbell does not have opposable thumbs...
@Tijo:

Tijo: If someone were to rub your shoulders while you cooked you could accomplish three things at once. I'm not naming any names but Tinkerbell does not have opposable thumbs...

Melissa: Haha! I like the sound of accomplishing three things simultaneously.

Michael: It’s hard to see a situation where there would be enough people in the kitchen to rub shoulders with—oh wait! That’s rubbing elbows. Sorry.

Melissa: So I wonder what the fourth thing could be . . .

Michael: Installing tanning lamps so you could get a tan at the same time?

Melissa: Oh dear. That sounds scary. I was thinking more along the lines of learning a foreign language. Maybe if I listened to audiobooks in French—which I have actually done before—then I could be brushing up on my French, too. So that could count as a fourth thing.

Michael: Very good, love! I could only think of joke ones.
Marvelous piece of work here. I especially enjoyed this observation:
"I have a life of the imagination. When I’m sitting somewhere, I’m not there. I’m somewhere else. I may be in the middle of a piece of code, trying to figure out why it’s not working. Or I may be in a story, seeing what the protagonist will do next."
I think that is how my son's mind works (and mine too, quite often). Very creative and fun post here. And tinkerbell is quite a beauty!
@dustbowldiva:

“Marvelous piece of work here.”

Thank you dustbowldiva, and welcome to metaness!

“I especially enjoyed this observation: "I have a life of the imagination. When I’m sitting somewhere, I’m not there. I’m somewhere else. I may be in the middle of a piece of code, trying to figure out why it’s not working. Or I may be in a story, seeing what the protagonist will do next." I think that is how my son's mind works (and mine too, quite often).

We’re just beginning to learn about your son, who sounds delightful. So wonderful that you have encouraged his creativity. Perhaps you can share some of his drawings and writing in a future post?

“Very creative and fun post here.”

It’s good to know that a newcomer can dive in anywhere and enjoy. Most of our readers have been following along for a while, so we need to be careful about assuming prior knowledge.

“And tinkerbell is quite a beauty!”

Yes, she’s a devious little diva :-) We really shouldn’t be feeding our neighbor’s kitty, but it’s hard to resist her insistent scratching and pitiful meowing!

( m&m )
shit, my friend didn't comment here. she must have just read and rated. well, i will have a word with her, for sure!!! or maybe i just couldn't find her comment in the looooooooooooong ass comment section.

i'm having the best time. i'm watching BBCA's How Do YOu Solve a Problem Like Maria? where they are choosing the Maria for Andrew Lloyd Webber's new production of The Sound of Music. they are down to the last two. i love the singing. i love the British faces and accents, i love that there is no Paula Abdul slurring and swaying around. it's not just Sound of Music songs. god, i miss going to the theater. Boston is a pre-Broadway tryout city so you could get great deals on tickets and see amazing things. old things that young people wouldn't remember or know. :) tickets are so expensive here. no half-price booth. and no original cast members, of course. if and when my ex-con mother has the decency to die and i get some of grandma esther's money, i may get my ass to NYC and just see plays. then go to Vegas and see Bette and other shows. my heart aches for this stuff. screenwriting and playwriting were my THANG, after all. love lvoe love
@Theodora:

“shit, my friend didn't comment here. she must have just read and rated. well, i will have a word with her, for sure!!!”

Don’t be too hard on her, Theodora. She did us the honor of favoriting us, which is what we happened to do with her yesterday (coincidentally, since we had no idea you were friends until your PM today!).

“or maybe i just couldn't find her comment in the looooooooooooong ass comment section.”

Yes, we always think it’s funny (and a blessing, truly) when our comments section is longer than the “looooooooooooong ass” post itself! We’re grateful people with short attention spans have the perseverance to read in spurts ;-)

“i'm having the best time. i'm watching BBCA's How Do YOu Solve a Problem Like Maria?”

Sounds like the beginnings of a great blog post!

“i love the British faces and accents”

Yes, a couple of years ago, we bought a region-free DVD player so we could watch our beloved Britcoms: Black Books, 15 Storeys High, Peep Show, Look Around You, Mitchell and Webb, 3 Non-Blondes, etc. We’d put links, but OS seems to balk at too many links in comments.

“god, i miss going to the theater. Boston is a pre-Broadway tryout city so you could get great deals on tickets and see amazing things. old things that young people wouldn't remember or know. :) tickets are so expensive here. no half-price booth. and no original cast members, of course. if and when my ex-con mother has the decency to die and i get some of grandma esther's money, i may get my ass to NYC and just see plays. then go to Vegas and see Bette and other shows. my heart aches for this stuff. screenwriting and playwriting were my THANG, after all.”

Your life is starting to resemble what Wallace Shawn describes in My Dinner with Andre, where he says, “I've lived in this city all my life. I grew up on the Upper East Side. And when I was ten years old, I was rich, I was an aristocrat. Riding around in taxis, surrounded by comfort, and all I thought about was art and music. Now, I'm 36, and all I think about is money.”

So instead of going to plays, he’s having to fret about paying the bills. But as you know, suffering can make for great art fodder—and tragicomedy!

( m&m )