Eschew Obfuscation - Espouse Elucidation

Freedom of Speech Doesn't Ensure Freedom After Speech
JANUARY 15, 2012 6:28PM

'TIZ NOW THE TIME: A Retirement Poem

Rate: 11 Flag

 IntoBrightness copy

’Tiz Now The Time

 

Do you remember yesteryear

When all the world was bright?

Think you back to days gone by

When all about seemed right?

 

Where is that youth who longed to seek,

To question and to know

Of all that could be, was, or is

In heaven and below ?

 

The weight of life has bent you down

With worry and with care

As you took up the scythe and plow

And raised a family fair.

 

At last, at last, the time is come

For you to lift your eye

And dream once more of knowing all,

Of earth and of the sky .

 

The body now is nae so quick

Yet mind is ever bright

T’will light another year or two

Ere comes the endless night.

 

Tread now those paths you longed to roam

When you were but a child.

Go! Mysteries solve and Answers seek

And tame the Beasties wild!

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Photo from the internet.

Critiques welcome!
.
"And tame the beasties wild!" A fearless and hopeful poem. Loved it.
Besides questioning nae as a real word (na, who cares), love it.. the sentiment
Sounds about right. Venture forth!
Tr ig,
nae |nā|
adjective, exclamation, adverb, & noun
Scottish form of no .
adverb & noun
Scottish form of not .
.
I do love this!
And if this is where you are, I hail your good fortune and await more insights!
If my bits were a bit less worn and achy, I would say retirement is one of the better times of my life! I'm one of the very lucky ones, I know that. Life is good!
wonderful. optimistic yet realistic.
Loved this; good to see you, Sky!
Phyllis,
I's venturin' - I's venturin' !!!!


Spike,
Yes'm. Will that be Express or Regular shipping?



Chrissie,
The achy bits are just there to remind you of how bad things could have been! Gotta love retirement!


eleanorr,
Thankee muchly!


.
Read with my best Scottish voice. Not easy but worth it.

"Rate the sucker FRed(tm) I enjoyed that."
Nice post. From where I am sitting, retirement rocks!! R
Nicely expressed, Sky, from someone else who is at or near that stage.

And remember, Trig, "If it's nae Scottish, it's crrrrrrap".
Wow Creek; a Limey with a Scots brogue! THAT must be something to hear!


Gerald,
It surely has its good points!


Bo,
Tr ig just never watched enough of the original Star Trek to pick up on Scotty's accent.....
.
Regarding the Scottish accent, I was talking to a homeless Scottish bloke yesterday - nice enough chap,still smartly dressed - bought him a mug of tea so had time to brush_up on my accent.
Couldn't understand a damn word he said but it helped reading your poem.
This one hurts.The catacomb above is somehow depressing yet peaceful.The dove in the inner vaulted arch finding her way into new realms.The flowering green to the right and the oil lamp at the left implying eternity.
You might be at the end of your life but I perceive a not ending fountain... forcing the creator out of this "old" man.
Age is a matter of attitude and reality of given days,hours,minutes...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=lNvAVIVP8xc
On you go,friend...spilling out the wisdom of life captured in your beautiful thoughts and rhymes.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=z3c1nTgPxvE
Feb 8, 2013 - Uploaded by Mike Magatagan
Published on Feb 8, 2013
"Es ist ein Schnitter, heisst der Tod" ("There is a reaper called death", even the "Grim Reaper" or just "reaper song"), is a German folk song of the 17th Century, first published as a Broadside ballad in Regensburg in 1638, in the middle of the Thirty Years War. The original words extend the common metaphor of death as the reaper over 16 unremittingly grim verses, in keeping with the grim times in which it was written. The title translates as "Death, the Reaper", and the first verse is:

"There is a reaper, his name is Death / His power comes from God above / Today he sharpens his knife, it's cutting much better already / Soon he will scythe through, we can only suffer it / Look out, beautiful little flower."

It goes downhill from there.

Although originally written for Chorus, I created this arrangement by adding a Flute and arranging for Flute and Concert (Pedal) Harp.
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Music
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